Monthly Archives: November 2016

A Great Facts About Coffee

12 Great Facts About Coffee

Coffee is an integral part of so many peoples’ daily routine, we often don’t give it a second thought. So we thought it would be amusing to put together a list of interesting facts about coffee that you might not know….

No matter what anyone tells you, caffeine cannot help you sober up, it’s a complete myth. Shame.

Hawaii is the only US state that grows coffee

Coffee was originally eaten and not drunk. It’s said to have been discovered when goat herders noticed increased energy levels after their goats had been eating coffee cherries that had fallen on the ground.

Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world, after oil. To give you an idea of how widely consumed it is, Starbucks alone employs 151,000 people worldwide, while in Kenya, 5 million people are reliant on the coffee industry for their income.

The price of espresso served in bars and cafes in Italy is regulated by the Italian government because it is considered an essential part of their daily life.

All of the world’s coffee is grown in the ‘bean belt’. So specific are the conditions needed to successfully grow coffee that the northernmost coffee producing country in the world is Pakistan.

An epidemic of theft and violence is sweeping the coffee industry in Kenya, a country where a kilo of dried beans can be worth a week’s wages. A special police force has been set up to deal with the problem, but raids by armed gangs are a daily occurrence. Coffee growers have being forced to sleep in their fields so they can fend off would-be thieves. The thieves aren’t subtle, with reports of security guards at coffee factories being shot with arrows and beaten to death with branches. Villagers have taken to fighting fire with fire, and criminals caught in the act have been lynched in the street.

Over 500 billion cups of coffee are drunk each year, or around 1.4 billion cups per day. Over half of this is consumed during breakfast.

Coffee can be used to fuel a car. While the technology is still in its infancy, there is something reassuring in knowing that the same cup that gets you going in the morning could one day actually get you to work as well.

A little known fact, but worth knowing anyway – brewed espresso has 2.5% fat, while filtered coffee contains 0.6% fat.

The world’s first webcam was invented at Cambridge University to let scientists in a technology group know if their coffee pot was full or not. In 1991, they aimed their camera at their coffee machine and streamed the footage live on the web to save themselves the disappointment of a fruitless trip. This picture is of the first ever broadcast.

Irish coffee was originally invented to warm up cold American airline passengers flying from Ireland.

If you have any more of your own to share, we’d love to hear them so please get in touch with us at Java Caffe.

Now Introduction to Bread Ingredients

Bread Flour

Bread flour has a high content of gluten so sometimes you may see this advertised as high gluten flour. High Gluten flour contains high protein and is usually a good flour for bread makers.

It makes the bread very elastic and will keep the bread from sinking or caving in after it has risen.

This flour is good for making a large size loaf of bread with a really good inner fiber because of the high gluten content.

It may sound obvious but there is not a more important ingredient when it comes to making bread.

Plain Flour

Plain flour is made by mixing well chosen soft and hard wheat and is best for making bread and cakes.

Whole Wheat Flour

Whole wheat flour is made by grinding whole wheat. It contains the skin of wheat and it is heavier and more nutritious than common flour. Bread made by whole wheat flour is usually small in size. Most recipes for wheat bread will combine the whole wheat flour and bread flour in order to achieve the best results.

Black Wheat Flour

Black wheat flour also known as “rough flour” is a high fiber flour that is very similar to whole wheat flour. To obtain a large size after rising it needs to be used in combination with a high proportion of bread flour.

Cake Powder

Cake powder is made by grinding soft wheat or low protein wheat which is used for baking cakes.

While most flours seem to be very much alike it comes down to the yeast performance in combination with the flour and the way in which it is absorbed.

The area or region in which the ingredient is grown, stored and ground also plays a role in the performance of the wheat.

It never hurts to try a few different brands of flour to get an idea of what works best for you as well as tastes the best.

Corn Flour and Oatmeal Flour

Corn flour and oatmeal flour are made by grinding corn and oatmeal respectively. They are both the additive ingredient of making rough bread which is used for enhancing the flavor and the texture of the bread.

Sugar

Sugar is very important to the mix for adding taste and color. (In my opinion I do not think sugar is necessary.) I have made many a loaf without sugar and I can not tell the difference in taste or color.

Sugar does help to nourish the yeast to make a better rising bread.

If you are using a bread maker you may want to look for the ingredients in your super market that say “great for bread makers.” I seem to believe these ingredients that come advertised for the bread makers are of a different quality than those prepared for traditional baking.

Yeast

Yeast breaks down and than produces carbon dioxide which makes the bread expand and the inner fiber soft. Yeast also relies on sugar and flour as a source of nourishment.

Yeast also must be stored at a cool temperature so the refrigerator is an ideal spot for it.

Salt

Salt is necessary to improve bread flavor and the color of the crust. Salt is not a necessary ingredient so feel free to omit it all together. Your bread would actually be larger without the salt also.

Egg

Eggs will improve the texture of your bread as well as add nourishment and make it larger in size.

Grease, Butter and Vegetable Oil

Grease can make the bread soft and delay its storage life. Butter should be melted or chopped into small pieces before use.

Baking Powder

Baking powder is used mainly to make bread rise very fast. It will also bubble or soften the texture of the bread.

Baking Soda

Same principle as above and the two can be used in combination with one another.

Water

Water is a very essential ingredient to making bread so never leave it out of your recipe.

Gluten-Free Dessert Ideas For You

Sticking to a gluten-free diet is a challenge under the best of circumstances but when it comes to creating desserts things get even more difficult. So many delicious desserts like pies, cookies, cakes and pastries are made with flour containing gluten.

Creating delicious gluten-free desserts becomes easier when you keep the right ingredients on hand. Some common items to keep in your pantry include:

Almond meal flour
Arrowroot powder
Baking powder
Bittersweet chocolate
Canola oil
Cashew butter
Cocoa powder
Coconut flakes
Coconut milk
Cornstarch
Dried fruit
Espresso powder
Evaporated milk
Gluten-free flour mixes
Gluten-free spices
Granulated, powered and brown sugar
Lemon extract
Maple syrup
Nuts
Peanut butter
Rice
Seeds
Shortening
Sorghum flour
Tapico starch/flour
Vanilla extract

Be sure to check the ingredients on these products before you purchase them. You will want to avoid wheat, barley, brown rice syrup, caramel coloring, rye, brewer’s yeast, wheat starch, hydrolyzed wheat protein, malt, malt extract, malt syrup, dextrins and malt flavoring.

Remember that baking gluten-free is different than regular baking. If you don’t use a baking mix you will need to combine gluten-free flours to get the right results. You can use psyllium husks, ground chia seeds or flaxseed rather than xanthan gum if it gives you stomach distress. Baking at a lower temperature is recommended for some recipes to keep your dessert from getting too brown. If you screw up a recipe consider turning it into crumbs for toppings or to be added to other recipes.

Many gluten-free flours don’t contain preservatives so you may find that desserts made with them dry out quickly or become rancid. Store these items in a zip-top bag (with air removed), freezer wrap or in an air tight container in the refrigerator or freezer separated from other food. Mark all containers used for gluten-free food to keep them separate from other containers. Bring the stored food to room temperature before consuming.

Our favorite gluten-free dessert recipe courtesy of http://bakedbree.com.

Gluten Free Blueberry Crisp

Ingredients:

4 cups blueberries (any fruit will work)

Crisp:

1 cup gluten free old-fashioned, gluten free oats (we used Bob’s Red Mill GF oats)
1/2 cup chopped raw pecans
1/2 cup almond meal
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1/2 teaspoon salt

1. Wash and pick over the blueberries. Add to an 8×8 pan. Add oats, pecans, almond meal, olive oil, maple syrup, and salt to a small bowl. Mix to combine.
2. Spread the mixture over the blueberries.
3. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 35 to 40 minutes, longer if the berries are frozen.

This Food Coach Buckinghamshire

Everyone has checked in, crazy food fact and all-in, the group are eager to start their day. ” Let the foray begin! ” First the stars of the day are introduced, two monumental haunches of beautiful, fresh, local wild boar. The group embrace the meat, some touching & feeling, some using there sense of smell, some not !!! Mission of the day is to create the most amazing slow roasted, emotionally marinated feast for tonight’s celebration, forage the woodland paths, hedgerows, orchard and kitchen garden for ideal ingredients……divide into two equal teams, easier said than done 🙂 Off they go baskets and bowls, whilst the haunches await their return.

You may see from the list of ingredients the two groups have plenty to keep them curious ? … Teams, the clock starts now; German time exactly 6 hours…. Italian time when the oven is filling the kitchen with beautiful aromas, the meat is succulent and falls from the bone and the wine has had time to breath.

Team 1 get to work, creating a wonderful marinade of grated ginger, roasted chillies, crushed black pepper, olive oil,massaging the meat, to utter contentment, like a fully sensual deep tissue massage, creating a bed of halved apples and onions, finally filling the roasting tray with crisp, dry English cider, adorned with ripped bay and tied sprigs of fresh thyme and chilli, a grating of lemon zest….. and into the oven.

Team 2 also get started, smashing garlic, olive oil and sea salt, carving little pockets to stud with rosemary, thyme, sage and the lightly smashed bulbs of garlic, they too give the boar a massage, more gentle, like a light shoulder rub, add lots of seasoning, a bed of apples, berries and various herbs, a bottle of red wine poured over the top to help it on its way…….and also into the oven.

They agreed together that the lifted root vegetables, celeriac, carrots, beets and garlic would make for a handsome tray roasted dish, and the potatoes could be steamed and whipped up into a buttery, light and fluffy mashed side dish, with both making plans of their teams accompanying sauce from the trays, everything is boding well for supper……

Not much you may be feeling, well the remaining menu states otherwise. A roasted butter nut squash soup, roasted squash seeds, made with a tasty fresh vegetable stock, with little parcels of freshly made pasta, transformed into ravioli, filled with courgette, wood sorrel, parmesan and black pepper. And to celebrate, a trio of desserts; vanilla panacotta with a vibrant plum compote, hot chocolate puddings, oozing with hot chocolate sauce, amaretti and plum semi-freddo ( Italian meringue iced cream ) with spiced honeycomb shards, and a few life skills shared on the way. Back to the pasta…. Freshly made pasta the traditional way, loved and caressed to form silky light dough balls of joy, rested and then….. a pasta rolling, teams of two challenge, the longest sheet of perfect pasta in two minutes, such fun, finally creating half into the ravioli and the remainder into floury strands of fresh tagliatelli, left to dry in the gentle afternoon sun.

The table is adorned with fresh flowers from the meadow, shiny glasses and a sea of candles, the teams are sharing tales of there own pasta experience, laughter and wine corks popping fill the air. The soup is served and devoured by the hungry participants and heart kitchen team, a real triumph and so deliciously fresh.

The main event; two platters arrive, each bearing its own unique wild boar dish, scattered with roasted roots and a pile of creamy mash, two jugs of aromatic gravy both again unique in their taste and flavours, we set to work, carving and shredding – Wow – the aromas fill the dining yurt! Eager, we dig in, the two haunches taste oceans apart; both amazing though. We shared more stories of our day, connecting, more laughter and a hazy look of joy filling each person’s eyes. (could be the wine, but probably the delights of the day). We closed whilst eating our trio of stunning desserts, with a complete or incomplete for our day together and shared one moment we were grateful for, from the many!